166 Myron Drive Skyland, Nevada

Click here for a virtual tour:

http://tours.topnotch360.net/94799

The Skyland home you have been waiting for. With lake views and only a very short distance to Lake Tahoe, this home is located on a peaceful and private large lot with boulders and trees. There is a rare three car garage providing room for your cars and extra toys. The oversized, lake view deck has plenty of room to enjoy outdoor entertaining or just relaxing in the beautiful Tahoe environment. The interior features a spacious great room with light pine vaulted ceilings and numerous windows to enjoy the views and setting. The charmingly remodeled kitchen has hickory cabinets and corian counters along with a large island and breakfast bar. The huge pantry cabinet with multiple drawers provides extra storage for convenience. There is a fun loft area, accessed by a ladder which could be extra storage.

Three of the bedrooms including the master are located on the main living level with a fourth bedroom tucked away on the lower level. The master bedroom has two walk in closets and a French doors opening onto the deck outside.

The Skyland neighborhood features a private beach for homeowners and there are many walking and mountain bike trails in the area. It is also conveniently located to schools, shopping and entertainment nearby.

 

Steps to get your finances in order

Get Your Finances in Order: To-Do List

1. Develop a household budget. Instead of creating a budget of what you’d like to spend, use receipts to create a budget that reflects your actual spending habits over the last several months. This approach will factor in unexpected expenses, such as car repairs, as well as predictable costs such as rent, utility bills, and groceries.

2. Reduce your debt. Lenders generally look for a total debt load of no more than 36 percent of income. This figure includes your mortgage, which typically ranges between 25 and 28 percent of your net household income. So you need to get monthly payments on the rest of your installment debt — car loans, student loans, and revolving balances on credit cards — down to between 8 and 10 percent of your net monthly income.
3. Look for ways to save. You probably know how much you spend on rent and utilities, but little expenses add up, too. Try writing down everything you spend for one month. You’ll probably spot some great ways to save, whether it’s cutting out that morning trip to Starbucks or eating dinner at home more often.

4. Increase your income. Now’s the time to ask for a raise! If that’s not an option, you may want to consider taking on a second job to get your income at a level high enough to qualify for the home you want.

5. Save for a down payment. Designate a certain amount of money each month to put away in your savings account. Although it’s possible to get a mortgage with only 5 percent down, or even less, you can usually get a better rate if you put down a larger percentage of the total purchase. Aim for a 20 percent down payment.
6. Keep your job. While you don’t need to be in the same job forever to qualify for a home loan, having a job for less than two years may mean you have to pay a higher interest rate.

7. Establish a good credit history. Get a credit card and make payments by the due date. Do the same for all your other bills, too. Pay off the entire balance promptly.

 Reprinted with permission from Realtor.org/Realtormagazine

 

Preparing Your Home For a Virtual Tour

Prepare Your Home for a Virtual Tour

With more buyers shopping for homes on the Web, photos and virtual tours are a must. There are many things you can do make your home shine on camera.

 

1. Understand the camera’s perspective. The camera’s eye is very different from the human eye. It magnifies clutter and poor furniture arrangement. To make a home shine in a virtual tour or video presentation, cater to the lens.

2. Make the home “Q-tip clean.” Because the camera magnifies grime, each room must be spotless. Don’t forget floor coverings and walls; a discolored spot on the rug might be overlooked by prospects during a regular home showing, but that stain becomes a focal point for online viewers.

3. Pack up the clutter. But leave three items of varying heights on each surface. For example, on an end table you can place a lamp (high), a small plant (medium), and a book (low).

4. Snap pictures. This will give you an idea of what the home will look like on camera. Closely examine the photos and list changes that would improve each room’s appearance: opening blinds to let in natural light, removing magnets from the refrigerator, or taking down distracting art.

5. Pare down furniture. Identify one or two pieces of furniture that can be removed from each room to make the space appear larger.

6. Rearrange. Spotlight the flow of a space by creating a focal point on the furthest wall from the doorway and arranging the other pieces of furniture to make a triangle shape. The focal point may be a bed in a bedroom or a china cabinet in a dining room.

7. Reaccessorize. Include a healthy plant in every room; the camera loves green. Energize bland decor by placing a bright vase on a mantle or draping an afghan over a couch.

8. Keep the home in shape. You want buyers who liked what they saw online to encounter the same home in person.

Source: Barb Schwarz, www.StagedHomes.com, Concord, Pa.

Reprinted with Permission from Realtor Magazine, National Association of Realtors.

 

 

 

How to Get An Offer on your Home

How to Get an Offer on Your Home

1. Price it right. Set a price at the lower end of your property’s realistic price range.

2. Prepare for visitors. Get your house market ready at least two weeks before you begin showing it.

3. Be flexible about showings. It’s often disruptive to have a house ready to show at the spur of the moment. But the more amenable you can be about letting people see your home, the sooner you’ll find a buyer.

4. Anticipate the offers. Decide in advance what price and terms you’ll find acceptable.

5. Don’t refuse to drop the price. If your home has been on the market for more than 30 days without an offer, you should be prepared to at least consider lowering your asking price.

Used with permission from REALTOR.org/realtormag

 

Lender Checklist: What you Need for a Mortgage

Lender Checklist: What You Need for a Mortgage

 

□         W-2 forms — or business tax return forms if you’re self-employed — for the last two or three years for every

person signing the loan.

 

□         Copies of at least one pay stub for each person signing the loan.

 

□         Account numbers of all your credit cards and the amounts for any outstanding balances.

 

□         Copies of two to four months of bank or credit union statements for both checking and savings

accounts.

 

□         Lender, loan number, and amount owed on other installment loans, such as student loans and

car loans.

□         Addresses where you’ve lived for the last five to seven years, with names of landlords if

appropriate.

 

□         Copies of brokerage account statements for two to four months, as well as a list of any other major assets of

value, such as a boat, RV, or stocks or bonds not held in a brokerage account.

 

□         Copies of your most recent 401(k) or other retirement account statement.

 

□         Documentation to verify additional income, such as child support or a pension.

 

□         Copies of personal tax forms for the last two to three years.

 

 

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